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"R has had a revolutionary effect on the way statistics are communicated." So says John Chambers: one of the members of the R-core team overseeing R; and co-inventor of the S language. In this interview with Trevor Hastie (his co-author on Statistical Models in S), John Chambers recounts his involvement in the birth of the S language in 1976, and how it evolved over the years to become the inspiration for the R language<

In 2012, filmmakers Sophie and Liberty took a canoe trip on the Shannon River in Ireland. You can see their approach to a fog-enshrouded island in the still frames at the start of this video, and then they encountered sometime breathtaking in motion:

Want to see how you can use a drag-and-drop user interface to run and share R code? Check out our webinar next Wednesday January 29 (hosted by Alteryx and Revolution Analytics): Creating Value That Scales with Revolution Analytics & Alteryx

RStudio's Hadley Wickham has just introduced a new package for filtering, selecting, restructuring and aggregating tabular data in R: the dplyr package. It's similar in concept to Hadley's original plyr package from 2009, but with several key improvements:

Choropleth maps are a popular way of representing spatial or geographic data, where a statistic of interest (say, income, voting results or crime rate) are color-coded by region.

The team at AMPLab has announced a developer preview of SparkR, an R package enabling R users to run jobs on an Apache Spark cluster.  Spark is an open source project that supports distributed in-memory computing for advanced analytics, such as fast queries, machine learning, streaming analytics and graph engines.

Zach King consistently manages to combine humour, surprise and magic into six-second vignettes on his Vine channel. Here's a compilation — it's 7 minutes total, but I bet you watch to the end.

 

In case you missed them, here are some articles from December of particular interest to R users:

A ComputerWorld tutorial on basic data processing with R.

Prediction: R will replace legacy SAS solutions and go mainstream.